AIN’T NO MAN ABOVE THE PIFA CRU

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY KESHAWN PALMER

Dealing with the death of a brother is a burden that no one should have to bear, but in 2013, the members of PAID IN FULL ALLSTARS (PIFA) lost their CEO and founder Eric Wilkins aka AllstarEazy. Despite this devastating blow, the men continued to press on to achieve the success that Wilkins sought for himself and his brothers. After performing to a sold out crowd at Shaggfest 2015 this summer in Virginia Beach, that dream is getting closer to becoming a reality.

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NOVAFEST SUPPORTS LOCAL HIP HOP IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY SUPERNOVA SUPREMACY

Representing a variety of hip-hop styles from the Northern Virginia area, SUPERNOVA SUPREMACY have been described as “The Avengers of hip hop.” Though their fellowship does not include the Hulk or Captain America, the lyricism and power of MC Blank, Donnell Taurus, and Lion Goodwin packs a serious punch.

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NODIS LEADS THE PACK OF RISING D.C. HIP HOP ARTISTS EMERGING ONTO THE NATIONAL SCENE WITH THE RELEASE OF HIS DEBUT MIXTAPE AND PERFORMANCES AT SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS AND VIDEO BY DJ FAM PRODUCTIONS AND JOHN SHORE

It has been said time and time again that the youth are the future, and they will lead the way to better times. NODIS is no exception. Off the stage, he is known to his family and close friends as Sidon Faris. This Washington, D.C. resident is only 19 years old, and he is making moves that most kids his age only dream of. Last month, NODIS released his debut mixtape, which features his partner of BRADDOCK ROAD, as well as long-time friend GRAMMAR, in addition to local producer BALA ORTIZ. Just two weeks after its release, NODIS had the opportunity to perform in Austin, Texas at South By Southwest (SXSW). We spoke with him to discuss his mixtape 22nd Century and his unconventional method of promoting it on social media, as well as how this lion will lead the sheep of the universe to make a turning point in their lives.

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ROBERT MCFARLAND “MAKES KNOWLEDGE BORN” WITH THREE UPCOMING ALBUMS CURRENTLY IN PRODUCTION TO BE RELEASED WITHIN THE NEXT YEAR

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ROBERT MCFARLAND

Taking inspiration from historical black leaders, such as Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcom X, as well as religious and cultural influences in hip hop, ROBERT MCFARLAND is taking on topics not talked about in pop music and the majority of hip hop in order to spread his message and “make knowledge born” to the masses. Originally from Virginia Beach, McFarland has been living in Brooklyn for the past year while making connections with other artists and music industry professionals.

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VIRGINIA BEACH INDEPENDENT RAPPER NAY NAY AND SINGER-SONGWRITER BRYAN MAHON TO PERFORM SHAGGFEST 2015 THIS SUMMER

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS AND VIDEO PROVIDED BY NATHAN SWIHART

Though you probably haven’t heard of NAY NAY yet, this 20-year-old rapper from Virginia Beach is on the verge of breaking out of the underground and into the eyes and ears of the mainstream local community. After paying his dues in the local music scene, NAY NAY and fellow Virginia Beach musician BRYAN MAHON have been selected to play Z104’s annual music festival Shaggfest, which is hosted by the namesake of the festival, Shaggy — one of the radio station’s main DJs.

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ALBUM REVIEW: LOST IN SPACE BY NAY NAY

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Lost In Space by NAY NAY

https://naynay.bandcamp.com/album/lost-in-space

ALBUM REVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

Though he is no stranger to the rap game, 20-year-old Virginia Beach resident Nathan Swihart, who prefers to go by his nickname NAY NAY, is on the verge of breaking out from unknown independent artist to local celebrity. In February 2015, he released his debut album Lost In Space, which combines his personal easy-going style with the various producers he worked with, including 6ix, who is the most well known having worked for the hip-hop artist LOGIC. The first track, “Star of the Show,” really sets the scene for the album, providing the listener insight into NAY NAY’s flow that’s simultaneously laid back and aggressive. The soul of the background vocalist’s voice provides a nice compliment to NAY NAY’s autobiographical rhymes about him coming up as an aspiring rapper.

The fourth track, “Daps and Pounds,” stands out as a reflection of the preceding and following tracks, showing NAY NAY’s style and swagger. Though at times he comes off as a bit nerdy, it is not necessarily a bad thing, and he uses it to his advantage. As a song about confidence, it shows through each verse, and it will surely get your head bobbing. NAY NAY’s album really hits a climax with the title track “Lost In Space,” which is easily the most hype and aggressive track. This song is a party song, and there is no mistaking that. Yet it will be enjoyable whether you are listening to it in your car on the way to work or getting turnt up at the bar.

Combining classical elements with a modern flair, NAY NAY is definitely an artist to watch out for. If you are a fan of MAC MILLER, KID CUDI, or CHANCE THE RAPPER, you need to listen to NAY NAY.

ALTERNATIVE RAPPER HOUSTON HEARD PROMOTES NEW ALBUM, ABOVE BELOW AVERAGE, AND PERFORMS SHOWCASES FOR SHAGGFEST 2015 IN VIRGINIA BEACH

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY HOUSTON HEARD

Though he is still an up and coming rapper from an unlikely music scene, HOUSTON HEARD from Williamsburg, Va. is a name you should know. Finding influences in the alternative hip-hop genre, the rhymes of HOUSTON HEARD are more stylistic and refined, while simultaneously working in element of pop, dance, electronic, and classical music into each well-crafted song he produces. Though he did not respect the classics as a young boy, he has grown to appreciate the art of the piano as he has developed as a songwriter, and it too flows skillfully across the tracks on which it is played. Having established some notoriety in the Williamsburg scene, HOUSTON HEARD has set his sights on playing bigger shows on a much larger scale. Currently, he is busy promoting the release of his debut album Above Below Average, which was released on Jan. 20, 2015 and chronicles some of his struggles in the early years of high school, as well as performing showcases to play this year’s Shaggfest in Virginia Beach, which he hopes will help to bring more attention to his music and help more people relate to it.

What initially got you into rapping and making hip hop?

To be honest, it kind of just happened. I was in sixth grade, [and we had to do] a science project on something. And we made a song. It was absolutely terrible, but it was fun. I just went home that day and found beats on YouTube, and then I started rapping over them. I guess [from that] here I am now.

Who are some of your primary influences, as far as rapping goes?

I guess I just go off what I listen to, mainly alternative hip hop, like what I make. If I had to pick one it would be this guy named GEORGE WATSKY, who is a poet and a rapper from San Francisco. I go off of him for producing, writing, and the general flow of things.

HH2Has growing up in Williamsburg, Va. affected your rapping style and what you rhyme about?

I don’t think growing up in Williamsburg has really affected anybody, to tell you the truth (laughs). Obviously there is not as big of an influence as there would be in Los Angeles, Chicago, or New York. Obviously, Williamsburg, Va. isn’t really known for its hip hop. So I would say, not really.

I really enjoyed hearing you play piano on this record, in addition to your rapping. How long have you been playing that instrument?

I started playing piano a while ago. I was [about] eight; my mom always wanted me to play. Then my piano teacher actually told my mom that it would be a waste of money to be spending the money on the lessons because I didn’t want to learn any of the classical stuff. I kind of stopped for a little while, and a few years ago, I taught myself again. I like to incorporate it in everything, so I’ve gotten a lot better [throughout] the years.

One of the most standout tacks on your debut EP, in my personal opinion, is “Society,” which is very critical of the norms within American culture. Can you please explain in more detail how this song came to be?

I wrote that last year [2014]; it was actually the first song on the new album that I wrote. I put it out [before] and just redid it for the album. I made another beat for it and stuff. I was going through a pretty tough time … in my first two years of high school. … I was in the awkward, early teenage years. I was so obsessed with what people thought about me, and I got to the point where I just got tired of it. Then I sat down and wrote that song. It got me through it then, but now I’m past it.

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CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO HOUSTON HEARD

Are most of the songs written on Above Below Average from that timeframe?

I think, to be honest, everything I write is going to be effected by stuff of that nature. [On] the album that I am working on now, basically every song has that general feel to it, besides the more nonsensical ones like “Ain’t No Way” and “What’s Up Now.” Those I kind of just wrote to write. But “Hourglass,” “Won’t Be Easy,” “Society,” and “Brain Drain,” obviously, [can be applied to my years in high school].

In addition to performing on your own, you also are a member of the hip hop group DISTORTED AFTERSTORY, which also includes rappers BRIAN B and Chandler Matkins of BIG MAMA SHAKES. Is this more of a side project for each of you?

I hate to say it, but DISTORTED AFTERSTORY is just Chandler Matkins and his friend Ryan Foster, who produces the beats, and BRIAN B isn’t in it either. I just collaborate with them a whole lot. They are good friends of mine. I’m on their stuff, and they are on mine.

burgfestHave you performed any shows yet on your own, or do you have any booked?

I’ve got a friend that has a really nice basement for shows and parties, so last June for the heck of it, we did a concert in his basement. It was my first time performing. We made a stage out of pallets, and about 80 people showed up. It was great fun. On Dec. 20, 2014, we did this [show] called Burg Fest, which was initially supposed to be something like that, but then DISTORTED AFTERSTORY and BRIAN B got on board. And my friend named Colin McGuire, who is a DJ and goes by SHIP WRECK, [got on board as well]. We went all out; we packed the basement. There was absolutely no room, and we had a full sound system with lights. That was all done by Colin Cross, who runs Unkempt & Overcaffinated [Recording] Studio. I’ve also done a showcase, and I have another coming up on March 28 for Shaggfest at Sidelines in Virginia Beach.

In addition to “Society,” which track stands out the most to you as a personal favorite?

I would be lying if I didn’t say “Won’t Be Easy.” So far it is my favorite song that I have ever written. Tommy [Vereb], who sang the chorus on it, just made it fantastic. I just think, overall, it came together really well.

Going forward, what do you hope to accomplish in the rest of 2015?

I am working on an album right now, and I’m gonna try to get that out. I need a little bit of money first so I may do an Indiegogo or something like that. I want to get that out later in the year, and I am definitely trying to do Shaggfest, which is why I am doing the showcases. That would be sweet. Basically, I don’t see myself getting famous to the point where I am selling out huge venues. That was never my intention from the get-go. Obviously, I would love for people to know my name, and I’d love for people to connect to [my music]. That’s one of my main goals, to generally connect to people, because I’m not generally rapping about the “normal” things. I’m trying to be as relatable as possible and write just what comes to my mind. I would be lying if I said I didn’t want to nationally known by the end of the year. That may be farfetched, but it would still be cool and my mom would be proud of me for once.

For more updates on HOUSTON HEARD, be sure to “like” his Facebook page, follow him on Twitter, listen to his debut album Above Below Average on Bandcamp, and be sure to check out his next showcase in Virginia Beach at Sidelines on March 28.

ALBUM REVIEW: ABOVE BELOW AVERAGE BY HOUSTON HEARD

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Above Below Average by HOUSTON HEARD

https://houstonheardmusic.bandcamp.com/releases

ALBUM REVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

On his debut, 11-track album Above Below Average, alternative rapper and composer HOUSTON HEARD delivers sharp, quick rhymes with a flow so eloquent you might forget that he is just a teenager. Based out of Williamsburg, Va., HOUSTON HEARD is unapologetic track after track and the pop synthesized beats are equally captivating.

Following an intro track just shy of two minutes, HOUSTON HEARD introduces us to his skills with a few strokes of his keyboard before initiating his rhymes. The music itself is very bright and melodic, with a syncopated beat that can simultaneously get your head bobbing to the song and put a smile on your face. On the second track, “Tell Em,” he does not miss a beat in bringing the same energy and emotional reactions. The music is very reminiscent of OWL CITY and MC LARS.

The fourth track, “Society,” also features  another Williamsburg, Va. rapper BRIAN B and Chandler Matkins of BIG MAMA SHAKES. Together, along with HOUSTON HEARD, they form the group DISTORTED AFTERSTORY. The song itself is very unique in that it criticizes what society considers important, including having to meet expectations set by others, how “people judge you how you dress and the people that you slept with,” and how social media is more important than building real connections with other people. In the end of the song, HOUSTON HEARD has that last word in an a capella rhyme saying, “The only thing changing with the seasons is the weather. As people we’re supposed to get together but our ties are constantly severed, and we’re left on our knees with nothing but our diminished pride.”

After a brief interlude lasting just over a minute where HOUSTON HEARD lets the piano do the talking, he breaks into the eighth track “Won’t Be Easy,” which discusses moving on from a break up. The song is easy going and carefree while reflecting on what he may have done wrong to cause it. But he realizes that he is better off without that person and is happy to move forward. It’s a feel good pop song, and it helps to show more of his vocal range.

The album concludes with “Brain Drain,” opening with more key strokes and cultural criticism. His lyrics flow out so smoothly, and the elements of the song mesh together so cohesively, one might assume that HOUSTON HEARD has a higher status than he currently does in the music scene. Regardless, this album is proof that he will be one to keep an eye on as his career develops.

WASHINGTON, D.C.’S FOOTWERK DELIVER “NO STRINGS ATTACHED” PERFORMANCES ON TOUR IN 2015 IN PREPARATION FOR THE RELEASE OF THEIR DEBUT ALBUM, CASUAL ENCOUNTERS

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY FOOTWERK

Founded in 2010, FOOTWERK is a group of talented, and strictly platonic, musicians from the Virginia and Washington, D.C. music scenes that have come together to create some “no strings attached” musical experiences together.  Fortunately, there are no “missed connections” with this band, even though they met on Craigslist and have been making music together ever since, combining elements of hip hop, rock, and neo-soul. The bands lineup includes Fern (bass), Josh (drums), Kyle (rhymes), Melissa (vocals), Teddi (keys), and Eric (percussion). We caught up with Kyle to talk about how their ad seeking men and women has panned out with their current band members, their recently released song “Open Oceans,” and their opinions on how the music scene in D.C. compares to other cities they have played.

I understand your band members met through Craigslist. Did you hold auditions until you found the right group?

Not really. What happened was it was actually the first people that showed up, except for our bass player, [who] ended up being the people that stuck around, which is crazy.

When did you make the Craigslist post?

That was [about] four years ago.

That’s cool. I didn’t realized that you guys have been around for so long.

Yeah, it’s been a while.

Is FOOTWERK referring to a type of dance style?

No, not at all. We were thinking about names, and that’s what we came up with. Originally it was spelt [with an “O” instead of an “E”], but then when we started to get into trademarking [our brand], we decided to do that to avoid any issues. But then something came up where there is a group in England who spells it the same way we do (laughs). It was kind of pointless anyway.

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What was the original inspiration behind the name then?

We play a lot of “dancey,” party kind of shows, so it just kind of made sense. There wasn’t any deep thought behind it. It was just that we had a list of names, and that was the one that stuck.

Can you tell me about your “no strings attached” style of fan interactions, and what that means to you as a band?

The whole “no strings attached” thing is kind of a play on the Craigslist vibe. No Strings Attached is what we wanted to call the album, but Justin Timberlake and NSYNC beat us to the punch on that one. … We were in the van on our way to New York talking about album names, and that was something that came up. So [we thought], we all met on Craigslist; we should call our shit No Strings Attached, and then we talked about NSYNC, so we decided to call it Casual Encounters because that’s another section on Craigslist. It also has a bunch of different meanings attached to it as well.

Can you explain the different meanings of Casual Encounters?

We also wanted to get at the fact that it’s 2015, and everyone is always on their phone. Everyone is always on social media, and information moves so fast that it’s rare that you have a real interaction with anybody. Everything is just so casual and light. On Facebook, you see highlights of people’s lives, you see the good times, but you don’t see what life is really like. So the album has songs based about what’s going on in our lives and some real stuff, so that’s why we thought Casual Encounters made sense on a bunch of different other levels.

What is your song “Open Oceans” about?

“Open Oceans” is a nightlife song. The way that I described it to the other people that are on the record was that it’s about feeling “hungover” with the nightlife. For me, I don’t drink, but I still have that feeling of being hungover with it all. You play these shows, and it’s there to have a great time. Yeah, it’s fun, but after you are doing that night-in and night-out, you can get to feel hungover with it all.

That’s an interesting perspective on it. Do you think the Virginia and D.C. music scenes are oversaturated with bands and musicians?

I would say it’s undersaturated. We’ve been lucky enough to travel and play in other places where they have a real cool group of bands and people that are really good to each other and want to see each other succeed; they support each other. In D.C., [it seems to me like] everybody [thinks that somebody] is going to come take from them, and there’s not the same sense of community that I’ve seen [elsewhere]. It just doesn’t feel like there is a whole lot of love here compared to other places we’ve been.

Compared to what other places?

Philly is definitely the first place that comes to mind. When we started going up to Philly two and a half years ago, after the second time we were there, those bands would hit us up, and whenever we were in town, the same bands would come out to check us out and support, and tell their friends. They would offer us places to stay and really look out for us. It’s been the same in Baltimore and Annapolis, Md. as well. They have these little pockets of bands that all work together to help each other out. Maybe it is here in D.C., and we’re not a part of it. But for us, we haven’t experienced that here.

Are there any bands, DJs, rappers, or solo musicians that you feel stand out among the rest of the artists in the Virginia and D.C. music scenes?

BLACK ALLEY, by far. [They] are from D.C. I think they call it “soul garage,” but they’re dope. For me, they are head and shoulders above everyone, including us, that I’ve seen in this area.

What are some ways that you try to engage your audience that you feel is different from other bands or groups?

At shows, we try and connect with people on a personal level. … We try to keep it [on a] very blue collar, down-to-earth type of vibe. If we’re going through shit, we’ll talk about it, and [we try to] just keep it very personal and honest with people.

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This year, where are you planning to tour to? Do you have any festivals lined up yet?

We [will be playing the] Baltimore Frozen Harbor [Music Festival] next month. We are working on a bunch of festivals for the summer. We’re probably not gonna make it out west, but we’re definitely going down to Florida, [as well as] Boston, New York, the Carolinas — pretty much just all east coast is what we’re looking at right now.

For more updates on FOOTWERK, be sure to visit their website, “like” their Facebook page, subscribe to their YouTube channel, and follow them on Twitter and Instagram.

THE DC GENTLEMEN BRING THEIR RAW PERFORMANCE TO THE WASHINGTON, D.C. MUSIC SCENE, INCORPORATING A VARIETY OF GENRES INTO THEIR MUSIC

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INTERVIEW BY JOE FITZPATRICK

PHOTOS BY RAW ARTISTS WASHINGTON, D.C.

Prior to forming THE DC GENTLEMAN, vocalist Ryan Lucas had a desire to create music with like-minded individuals. Therefore, through Craigslist, he began his search to find equally talented musicians with a passion to create. Through his endeavors, he found keyboard and keytarist Jehrel Pickens, drummer Daryl Dudley II, and bassist Trevor Waling to be the best fit for his project. Since forming, the band has been featured in the the RAW artist showcase and has played many shows and music festivals in the District of Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, and the surrounding areas. Currently, the band is in the recording studio producing their debut album. We spoke with the band regarding how they began and how they interacted with each other, how the city of Washington, D.C. influences their music, as well as how the Washington, D.C. music scene compares to Virginia.

How would you describe the brand that you have created as THE DC GENTLEMEN?

Ryan: Basically when we say THE DC GENTLEMEN, we are representing the region. We established the band in D.C. a year ago.

I know you guys have the t-shirts with your logo on them that you wear during your performances, but how do you think you represent gentlemen of Washington, D.C.?

Jehrel: We’re really nice people (everyone laughs).

I heard that you guys originally met through Craigslist.  What was it the first time your guys interacted with each other?

Ryan: Basically, I put the band together. I created a body of music producing on my own months prior to getting together. I decided that when I was going to start performing, I needed to have a live band to back the music. Daryl, who is the drummer, is my cousin, but I met Trevor and Jehrel off of Craigslist. As far as our first interaction, basically I sent them the music that I wanted them to perform, which was about six songs, to practice on their own and to interpret the music that I sent them. Then they came to the first initial meeting ready to perform and jam. Really we were focused on a particular show. We didn’t necessarily worry about building friendships [at first]. We had a mission to perform for this show in Charlotte, N.C. We gave ourselves about a month to practice for it, and we started putting it together.

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Which of your band members live in Virginia, and who lives in Washington, D.C.?

Daryl: Ryan and I live in D.C.

Trevor: Me and Jehrel live in Virginia.

Do you guys have a second vocalist?

Trevor: It’s just Ryan for that. We actually had another vocalist that was with us for a little while, but due to his work schedule, he had to drop out. We’ve continued on with just Ryan since then.

One thing that I really love about your band is that you use a keytar in some of your songs. Why did you guys decide to go with that instrument since it is so rare in music today?

Jehrel: For the versatility. There was two things: one, being able to move. We don’t pull it out that often, but we do some dance moves. You just feel a little more like part of the band if you can move away from the keyboard, and the other thing was that we have been trying to use more analog sounds. The pedal that I run through is called a Monophonic Synthesizer, so it can only play one note at a time. So with the keytar, I can put effects onto it with my other hand. So I use one hand to play notes and the other hand to manipulate the sound.

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Since you guys live in both areas, how does the music scenes in Virginia and Washington, D.C. compare to each other?

Trevor: We definitely play a lot more in D.C. There are a lot more shows, especially for our genre of music.

Daryl: I feel, like Trevor said, we get a lot more shows in D.C. If we got more shows in Virginia, we could see how it turns out, but I think D.C. is mainly where everything goes down at.

Can you tell me about how you got involved with the RAW artist showcase and what it is about?

Ryan: We got involved with RAW Artists because I had been to a number of their showcases prior to them selecting us. Pretty much, it’s a showcase for up and coming independent artists, and they give them a platform to share their work. It’s not just music. It’s [also] visual art, poetry, films, short films, modeling, makeup, [and] fashion. They bring all those different elements together once a month, and it’s not just in D.C. It’s all around the world, I think. I know they do it all across the country, and they do have some places outside of the country where they get together. So basically, after going to their events, I saw they had a sign up for new talent, and I signed the band up. They took a look at the music that we had posted and our Facebook page, and they selected us to be a part of their showcase. It’s a cool thing because they only have a couple of artists from each genre of art, and they also film the performance and post it on YouTube. They also took photos of us that we could utilize for our own promotions.

How influential is the city of Washington, D.C. on your music?

Daryl: It definitely does inspire us. In D.C., we have an art form called go-go music, which we are trying to implement into some of our songs now. Also, when you go to bars in D.C., you hear a lot of different sounds, and we take a little bit of what we hear and try to make it our own sound.

I know that you guys are currently working on  a new album. What can your listeners expect from that?

Ryan: We are still in the early infant stages of it, meaning some songs haven’t been created yet that I think would go on this project, but what the direction is now is a fusion of different sounds. It’s sort of like a hip-hop, R&B, soul, rock, house, and electronic sort of mixture with the music, and I am laying over the music with the lyrics of the “every man” and the comings and goings of instances of living the city/suburban lifestyle. That’s pretty much my perspective on it.

Jehrel: I guess as far as the process right now, we have been tracking it live. So it is still a lo-fi recording where I guess we would go back and layer the sounds. That’s still to be seen, but hopefully it will be close to the way our performances are, which is why we wanted to record [this way] because we noticed a difference to the recorded product that compared to how Ryan produces. It’s very polished, and the live show we put on is a little more raw.

Do you guys have a projected release date for that yet?

Trevor: As soon as we can get it done (laughs).

I noticed on your Facebook page that you guy have been playing a lot of shows and festivals. When is your next show?

Trevor: Right now, we are just concentrating on getting these songs recorded, so we’re not focusing on the live music quite as much.

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Where can people listen to your music?

Daryl: They can go to YouTube and our Facebook page.

Jehrel: We can add you to our email too.

For more updates on THE DC GENTLEMEN, be sure to “like” their Facebook page, and visit their RAW Artist Profile.